Tag Archives: film

a little flashback to a magical time

Captured by Reigun and his Diana F+, from the birthday. It is still July. I have until the end of the month to talk about the birthday / accept birthday gifts / refer to the birthday / post pictures  from the birthday.

Portrait of the blogger and her boyfriends chin

Portrait of the blogger and her boyfriend's chin

Portrait of the blogger with her real writer friend Lauren.

Portrait of the blogger with her 'real writer' friend Lauren.

Portrait of the Diana camera by the Diana camera (I dont know how he did it either).

Portrait of the Diana camera by the Diana camera (I don't know how he did it either).

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the disposable memory project


being a massive fan of taking photos (note how I don’t use the word photography, I’m anything but a photographer) I came  across this awesome project called the Disposable Memory Project. in their words:

we’re leaving disposable cameras around the world.
hopefully, people will pick them up, take a few photos and pass them on, eventually returning home – so we can tell their stories.

they have some amazing shots in their collection. i really love this because i have a few old disposables and undeveloped rolls of film lying around my apartment (and even one in my bag) which I have yet to develop, and I have no idea what’s on them – how exciting, digital does not compare. i’ll get at least one developed this week. anyway you can totally get involved yourself. here’s how.


bad blogger. bad bad.

i know. not blogging enough. because there’s a lot on my desk at the moment that isn’t just rad happy times to blog about. will get back to normal soon, i promise. i did get round to spending a lot of time scanning in photos i found in my drawer. the yellow ones were taken with a Lomolito Yellow Flash. the square ones are my dearest Polaroid, and the rest were taken by my parents and grandparents, so i’m not too sure. i scanned them in to get on top of my film photos since I just got myself a Lomo Cyber Sampler which i’m snapping with at the moment and it’s all in aid of a scanning backlog. enjoy.

My birthday party 2007

My birthday party 2007

My birthday 2007

My birthday 2007

My birthday 2007

My birthday 2007

My birthday 2007

My birthday 2007

Playing with the Polaroid.

Playing with the Polaroid.

Polaroid fun (photo taken by Rei)

Polaroid fun (photo taken by Rei)

Jean and me on the Johnnie Walker Bus at the Loerie Awards 2007

Jean and me on the Johnnie Walker Bus at the Loerie Awards 2007

King James balcony 2007, taken by Sue Stewart

King James balcony 2007, taken by Sue Stewart

Mom and me, taken by my dad, 1980s

Mom and me, taken by my dad, 1980s

My mom and her sister, Joburg, 1950s

My mom and her sister, Joburg, 1950s

just another Dark Knight review

RIP Heath Ledger. You did good.

RIP Heath Ledger. You did good.

Batman has always been my favourite comic character. Despite the fact that every time I pick apart the specifics (he’s a man, who dresses like a bat, who doesn’t have any real powers) I can’t understand it myself, but it’s always been the case. Since our flight back from Margate was only at 9.30 pm on the Monday following the Loerie Awards, we had quite a bit of time to kill in Durban, so we headed off to Gateway Mall, where we saw they were showing The Dark Knight on Imax. And thus we found a way to spend our time.

In short, I loved the movie. The Imax experience made it all the more special since every time Batman leapt off a building you got the feeling you were remixing your innards to make them more dance-friendly. I was nervous, because Jack Nicholson is a hard act to follow, especially in a role like The Joker. I was even more nervous because I was worried I wouldn’t like Ledger’s performance, and then I would feel really bad since Ledger died and he deserved to go out with a good performance. But the nerves disappeared very fast, to be replaced with goosebumps.

The Joker as played by Heath Ledger is decidedly the most creepy villain to come out of either Marvel or DC stables since I can remember. Nicholson – for me – seemed to coast on his natural creep-factor, while Heath Ledger brought something a lot more frightening to the table – a villain based in a reality that a lot of people in this world face. The fact that his character had his faith in people taken away at an early age, and then he then set out to prove that any good man could be stripped down to his constituent monster if you took away what he loved, managed to scrape at a something sensitive that lurks in my spinal fluid. I guess having spent a lot of time trying to work out why criminals in South Africa cannot be reasoned with in their unflinching disrespect for human life, I have come across this story myself in many different examples. It was both moving and unnerving to see it on the big screen.

What really sold the story to me was the fact that despite the disturbing nature of Ledger’s Joker portrayal, I grew to really like the character. This reminds me of when I read American Psycho for the first time. Sure, he sliced up women and homeless people, but the author inspired empathy in me for the monster, as did Ledger. When I finished that book, I felt as if I’d lost a best friend.

I read somewhere once that characters in stories are merely focused and exaggerated versions of the various characters that live within and make up our minds. Everyone has a Joker, a Patrick Bateman, and only by loving those characters as well as loving the naturally likeable characters in your mind can you ever exercise any control over them. And that’s what makes super villains into just that – super. Liked, despite. Ah, man. I’m so glad this movie didn’t disappoint me. If you haven’t seen it, you’re in for a treat.